eject


eject
eject vb Eject, expel, oust, evict, dismiss mean to force or thrust something or someone out.
Eject, although it is the comprehensive term of this group and is often interchangeable with any of the others, carries the strongest implication of throwing out from within. So emphatic is this suggestion that the term covers actions so far apart as those implied by dislodge, disgorge, vomit, emit, dis-charge, and many other terms
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the volcano ejected lava for three days in succession

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eject an intruder from one's house

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the chimney ejected flames rather than smoke

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he was being ejected for taunting the pianist— Atkinson

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Expel stresses a thrusting out or a driving away; it therefore more regularly implies the use of voluntary force or compulsion than does eject and indicates more clearly than eject an intent to get rid of for all time; thus, the stomach ejects (rather than expels) material in vomiting since the emphasis is on casting out from within; one expels (rather than ejects)air from the lungs since in this case a degree of voluntary force and permanent ridding are both implicit
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expel a student from college

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a curse ... in his blood . . . which no life of purity could expelMeredith

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Octavian . . . forbade the practice of certain eastern cults, and expelled from Rome Greek and Asiatic magicians— Buchan

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Oust implies a removal or dispossession by the power of the law or, in more general use, by the exercise of force or by the compulsion of necessity
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in America ... a new set of officials oust the old ones whenever the Opposition ousts the Government— Shaw

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insidious attempts to disparage the findings of Reason, or to oust it from its proper province— Inge

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Evict means to turn out (as from house or home or one's place of business) by legal or equally effective process, commonly for nonpayment of rent
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after not paying their rent for six months, they were evicted by the sheriff

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the revolutionary artists ... in the first flush of victory . . . literally evicted the members and officers of the Imperial Academy— Read

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he volunteered to become foster father to a 400-pot family [of orchids] temporarily evicted from a nearby greenhouse— JAMA

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Dismiss (see also DISMISS) stresses a getting rid of something such as a legal case by rejecting a claim or prayer and refusing it further consideration
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this court reversed the judgement given in favor of the defendant, and remanded the case with directions to dismiss it—Taney

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or a fear, a grudge, or a hatred by ejecting it from the mind or thoughts
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I declare to you . . . that I have long dismissed it from my mind— Dickens

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or an unwelcome subject, duty, or prospect by taking adequate measures to ensure its no longer annoying or confronting one
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the Judge was sharply angry . . . because he found himself unable to dismiss the whole thing by packing the child off— Deland

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Analogous words: *exclude, eliminate, shut out, rule out, debar, disbar: *dismiss, discharge, cashier, fire, sack: *discard, cast, shed: reject, repudiate, spurn (see DECLINE)
Antonyms: admit (sense 1)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Eject — E*ject , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ejected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ejecting}.] [L. ejectus, p. p. of ejicere; e out + jacere to throw. See {Jet} a shooting forth.] 1. To expel; to dismiss; to cast forth; to thrust or drive out; to discharge; as, to eject a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • eject — /i jekt/ vt: dispossess Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. eject …   Law dictionary

  • eject — [ē jekt′, ijekt] vt. [< L ejectus, pp. of ejicere, to throw out < e , out (see EX 1) + jacere, to throw (see JET1)] 1. to throw out; cast out; expel; emit; discharge [the chimney ejects smoke] 2. to drive out; evict [to eject a heckler] …   English World dictionary

  • Eject — E ject, n. [See {Eject}, v. t.] (Philos.) An object that is a conscious or living object, and hence not a direct object, but an inferred object or act of a subject, not myself; a term invented by W. K. Clifford. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] || …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • eject — eject·ment; eject; …   English syllables

  • eject — i jekt vt to force out or expel from within <blood ejected from the heart (S. F. Mason)> ejec·tion jek shən n …   Medical dictionary

  • eject — mid 15c., from L. eiectus thrown out, pp. of eicere throw out, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + icere, comb. form of iacere to throw (see JET (Cf. jet) (v.)). Related: Ejected; ejecting …   Etymology dictionary

  • eject — (izg. idžèkt) m DEFINICIJA tehn. tipka za izbacivanje medija na audio i video uređajima (ili u računalnim programima) ETIMOLOGIJA engl. ← lat., v. ejektirati …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • eject — [v] throw or be thrown out banish, bounce*, bump, cast out, debar, disbar, discharge, disgorge, dislodge, dismiss, displace, dispossess, ditch, do away with*, drive off, dump*, eighty six*, ejaculate, eliminate, emit, eradicate, eruct, erupt,… …   New thesaurus

  • eject — ► VERB 1) force or throw out violently or suddenly. 2) (of a pilot) escape from an aircraft by means of an ejection seat. 3) compel (someone) to leave a place. DERIVATIVES ejection noun ejector noun. ORIGIN Latin eicere throw out , from jacere …   English terms dictionary


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